If you could change one thing about your body, what would it be?

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Today’s post introduces our new Nutrition Leader, June Lupiani, RD. June comes to Green Mountain with a deep and compassionate understanding of the issues facing women in eating supportively. And extensive experience in how to help them overcome those issues. She shares some of the basics in this post.

Loaded question, I know.  So before you dig too deep, take a minute and watch this great short brought to you by the not-for-profit, the Jubilee Project.  It’s called “50 People 1 Question.”

Watch Video: 50 People 1 Question

When It Comes To Body Image, Kids Get It

The way I see it, this is a great PSA that reminds us that everything we really need to know in life, we can learn from children.  Another humbling example of how many of us had life figured out by the end of primary school.

It gets me thinking of how often kids really do get it when it comes to things like self awareness and body image.  When I think about kids and self awareness, I think hunger is a great example.  Kids are so much more tuned in on this stuff, right?  Check out this list I created based on the way kids typically eat. (By the way, it’s also the approach we take with eating here at Green Mountain which is pretty interesting.)

What Kids Know About Healthy Eating

Kids eat when they’re hungry.

  • Try this, get in tune with your body.  This certainly takes some letting go of external cues or rules we typically pick up after primary school somewhere around the time of our first diet.  Rules that we have been following for a long time so go easy on yourself if you experience resistance on this one.

Kids eat until they’re satisfied.

  • Hmmm…notice how I didn’t use the word full here.  What does eating to the point of satisfaction feel like to you?  Is it different than feeling full?  Probably sometimes, maybe not all the time.
  • On the other side of the same coin, do you stop eating before you feel satisfied because you think you should?  If so, is this helping you out long term as in later that day or week?

Kids eat what they want based on what they like.

  • No kidding.  What do you like to eat?  Our bodies are meant to have and respond to likes and dislikes.  It’s primitive and it’s useful.
  • We’re human therefore we have deeper and richer reasons for eating beyond physiological need.  Honor that.

Kids don’t clean their plates…even if they have to sit there all night long.kids know about healthy eating

  • If you recognize satiation, go with it.  If you’ve been conditioned to eat everything on your plate, try something new.  It takes time and effort but observing satiety and using it to guide you can be a pretty great tool.

Kids trust their bodies.

  • Trust things like hunger and satiety.  Hard at first, sure.  Especially so if you’ve been putting so much faith into all that external wisdom we’ve gathered up through the years.  Again think of a kid on this one, they are typically so driven by internal cues that they refuse to be influenced by external expectations.

So maybe today try and eat like a kid.

See how you feel.  And maybe later work on that mermaid tail.

Have a great week!

Learn More Our Behavior and Emotional Health Program


2 responses to “If you could change one thing about your body, what would it be?”

  1. Norma Nill says:

    I liked the unhurried mood of this video, the honest answers, and surprise ending. Thank you very much!

  2. Beth Wilson says:

    This really makes you think….enjoyed it!!

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About the Author

Marsha Hudnall, MS, RDN, CD

If you’re looking for an embodiment of dedication disguised as obsession, look no further. Marsha is a registered dietitian who has spent the last four decades working to help women give up dieting rules and understand how to truly take care of themselves. Her mission in life is to help women learn to enjoy eating and living well, without worries about their weight. She encourages women to embrace their love of food, which you might call being a foodie. If so, it’s appropriate because being a foodie means you pay attention when you eat. That’s a recipe made in heaven for eating well. Marsha is the President and Co-Owner of Green Mountain at Fox Run.

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