Green Mountain at Fox Run http://www.fitwoman.com Women's Weight Loss Spa Retreat for Healthy Living Fri, 22 Aug 2014 19:47:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 Meghan Trainor’s #1 Hit “All About That Bass” – Body Positivity or Misogyny? http://www.fitwoman.com/blog/2014/08/21/meghan-trainors-1-hit-bass-body-acceptance/ http://www.fitwoman.com/blog/2014/08/21/meghan-trainors-1-hit-bass-body-acceptance/#comments Thu, 21 Aug 2014 13:00:22 +0000 http://www.fitwoman.com/?p=27605 A Body Image Breakthrough? Meghan Trainor sings she’s ‘bringing booty back’ in her new hit song “All About That Bass.”  Some say it’s a fun, catchy tune that boldly promotes body acceptance – or body celebration – even if you aren’t a “size two.”  Other say that it reinforces a superficial and misogynistic view of women. The positive message of this controversial song may […] Read more »

The post Meghan Trainor’s #1 Hit “All About That Bass” – Body Positivity or Misogyny? appeared first on Green Mountain at Fox Run.

]]>
A Body Image Breakthrough?
meghan trainor all about that bass

Meghan Trainor on The Today Show

Meghan Trainor sings she’s ‘bringing booty back’ in her new hit song “All About That Bass.”  Some say it’s a fun, catchy tune that boldly promotes body acceptance – or body celebration – even if you aren’t a “size two.”  Other say that it reinforces a superficial and misogynistic view of women.

The positive message of this controversial song may be in doubt - but with over 18 million views on YouTube (and climbing) and roughly half a million in sales in less than two months since making her debut, it’s obvious that the 20-year-old pop phenom has struck a powerful chord with young girls. “Bass” has rocketed it to Billboard’s Number One on Digital Songs, while displacing such pros as Jessie J, Ariana Grande, Nicki Minaj and Iggy Azalea.

Critiquing The Message and the Messenger

With society’s pressure on women and girls to look a certain way, “Bass” appears to be - at first blush – one young woman’s rebellious anthem that has quickly cultivated an enthusiastic following. According to Trainor, the song is meant as a declarative statement that sexy doesn’t come in one size, and women of all shapes have a right to feel good about their bodies.  

When writing the song, I was thinking about girls today…and the message of the song is to love your body no matter what,” said Meghan.

Some critics, however, say “Bass” perpetuates misogynistic stereotypes and opens itself up to ridicule. One blogger, Jenny Trout, questions why this song is being touted as positive message for women in the first place, and points out male bands who have covered the song “up the ante on the misogyny and body shaming” in their versions:


Former X-Factor competitors Emblem3 have covered “All About That Bass.” See how you feel about lines like, “Us guys like a little more booty to hold at night,” and “It’s pretty clear she ain’t no size two/but she can shake it shake it/the way she’s supposed to do,” when you’re listening to young men sing them…Are we supposed to applaud this? It’s positive to hear young men trash “skinny bitches,” just so some women can feel better about not fulfilling a standard of beauty they’re longing for?  ~ Trout Nation

Good point, but is Trainor to blame for not being progressive enough or in the ‘right’ way? Does “Bass” deserve to be ridiculed because male bands have chosen to do so?

“Skinny Bitches”

Perhaps this song is just a sad reflection of our society. The reality is that teen girls are preoccupied with wanting to be attractive and sexy to boys, and if their bodies aren’t a socially acceptable size, they can face horrendous weight stigma and bullying that leaves them vulnerable to eating disorders and long-term psychological damage.

Read This Related Article:
Loving Our Bodies
It may be that society is more deserving than “skinny bitches” of Trainor’s thinly veiled anger (and heaven forbid that a woman express anger – or anger directed at other women), but I wonder if it’s not better for women who feel disenfranchised to express some anger rather than turning it on themselves with all-too-common, self-destructive eating behaviors.

Trainor relates how some young girls who have been bullied say they’ve found solace and hope in her lyrics:


“I tear up and I call my mom like, ‘Did you see that? Did you read that one?’ because some girls are like, ‘I’ve hated myself. I hated life. I didn’t want to go to school. I get bullied. And then I heard your song and I cried,’” said Meghan. “They say they cried because they’re happy and they dance around the room. And I was just like, ‘What?’ It’s crazy.”

Yes, it is crazy. Our society has a mental illness when it comes to women and weight. Isn’t it crazy that a song that champions the sexiness of average-to-large body sizes is seen as a breakthrough?

Society Sorely Lacking In Positive Body Images

The “skinny bitches” lyric is getting a lot of attention, but Trainor also points out how society isn’t doing enough to change how it portrays women in the media:

I see the magazines working that Photoshop
We know that shit ain’t real
Come on now, make it stop  

As consumers, we have a lot of power we aren’t exercising. How long would it take for women’s magazines to change their imagery if we started a boycott? By buying – and buying into – the thin-crazed media message, women are their own worst enemies. Talk about reinforcing misogynistic stereotypes!

Read This Related Article:
When Body Positivity Feels Impossible
While a song that focuses on how women with “all the right junk in all the right places” are just as sexy to men as a “stick thin Barbie Doll” is inherently limited in it’s progressiveness, some say that it still holds a positive message:

I know you think you’re fat,
But I’m here to tell you that,
Every inch of you is perfect from the bottom to the top!

Would “Bass” have risen to number one on the charts with a different beat or melody? Perhaps not. Are there other songs by female artist that do a better job of promoting body acceptance without playing into stereotypes?  I’m sure there are, but that doesn’t explain why this particular song has gone viral.

“Bass” Apparently Fills A Body Positivity Void

Ultimately, the song’s popularity with fans – who are calling themselves “Megatrons” – demonstrates how desperate teen girls are to feel good about their bodies. Meghan herself laments how she could have used a song like hers when she faced peer pressure and body image issues in school:


“I wish there was a song like this when I was 13,” said Meghan, admitting that she’s not always confident. “It’s all mostly in my head. I would sit there in class like, ‘I know they are judging me right now. I know they’re picking on me.’ So it helped me a lot, watching this video and seeing the comments that were positive.”

Whether you think the song is deserving of being dubbed a “body acceptance breakthrough” is up to you. For me, the positive aspect of “Bass” is that it has generated global discourse on body image, body acceptance and weight stigma. People are talking about these issues from all sides and perspectives. And clearly, as a society, we need to have that discussion.

You Decide: Watch the “All About That Bass” Music Video

Read the full All About That Base lyrics here.

Is “All About That Bass” is a positive or negative message for women? Why do you think it’s so popular?


Learn More About Our Young Women’s Program

 

The post Meghan Trainor’s #1 Hit “All About That Bass” – Body Positivity or Misogyny? appeared first on Green Mountain at Fox Run.

]]>
http://www.fitwoman.com/blog/2014/08/21/meghan-trainors-1-hit-bass-body-acceptance/feed/ 0
An Interview With Chiara Mazzucco, CEO and Editor-in-Chief of Indie Chicks http://www.fitwoman.com/blog/2014/08/20/indie-chicks/ http://www.fitwoman.com/blog/2014/08/20/indie-chicks/#comments Wed, 20 Aug 2014 13:00:33 +0000 http://www.fitwoman.com/?p=27646 Women’s magazines don’t usually don’t interest me with their barrage of diets and gravity-defying, bun-tightening fitness routines juxtaposed next to recipes and fashion models. Then I came across a women’s magazine and blog that’s trying to be different: The Indie Chicks.  Ok, I thought, an inner badass could be quite useful. Intrigued by Indie Chick’s fresh voice and attitude, I interviewed Chiara Mazzucco, CEO, Editor-in-Chief, to […] Read more »

The post An Interview With Chiara Mazzucco, CEO and Editor-in-Chief of Indie Chicks appeared first on Green Mountain at Fox Run.

]]>
indie chicksWomen’s magazines don’t usually don’t interest me with their barrage of diets and gravity-defying, bun-tightening fitness routines juxtaposed next to recipes and fashion models. Then I came across a women’s magazine and blog that’s trying to be different: The Indie Chicks


There’s no right way to live, no right career path to choose, and no specific way you need to look. When you’re an Indie Chick, you are constantly striving to become the best version of yourself, knowing your inner badass is there to tap into whenever you need her.
~ TheIndieChicks.com

Ok, I thought, an inner badass could be quite useful. Intrigued by Indie Chick’s fresh voice and attitude, I interviewed Chiara Mazzucco, CEO, Editor-in-Chief, to learn more about their concept, mission and current campaign to crowd fund the magazine’s next issue.

How did the idea for Indie Chicks come about?

When I first met my senior editor, Julie Zantopoulos, I was in California but planning to move to NY.  I had been a personal blogger and had gotten my name into the blogosphere, and Julie had a personal blog as well.  She offered to help me fill in for me on my website while I was moving across the country. That’s when we started developing the idea of the Indie Chicks.

As a relationship blogger, women would come to me and say “I broke up with my boyfriend, can you help me get him back?” and I would say, “No, let’s help strengthen you instead.” That developed into the concept of a publication to help empower women.  We launched the website in 2012 and the magazine in January 2014.

Last summer, Julie and I met Chrystal Rose (an indie author whom we featured) in a mastermind group we had started. It was a perfect fit, and she became our President and COO. One partner dropped, so for the past several months it’s been the three of us.


You say that you want to help women tap into their “inner badass.” What does that mean and what is the Indie Chicks’ main mission?

We want to help women identify and strengthen their sense of self. Every woman wakes up and in the 10 seconds before she becomes someone’s wife, mother, colleague - or whatever that role is - for that 10 seconds she’s just herself.

Our mission as a brand is to put emphasis on that core self to create a ripple effect of strength, success and happiness, no matter what role a woman plays.

Most women’s magazines are about “How to Be a Better Girlfriend” or “How to Get that Career,” but no one was really saying, “Hey, let’s talk about you. Let’s talk about what you want in life and what you want in a partner.”  We are bringing the focus back to what women want for themselves.


In “Weighing Your Self Worth,” Chrystal writes how “the number on the scale” would impact her self-esteem.  How is Indie Chicks trying to change the message about women’s weight, health and fitness?

It’s not about what you weigh or what you look like, but that you’re happy and that – more than anything – you’re healthy.  You need to be at peace with your own body because you’re the one that is going to sleep and waking up with that body.

That’s why our campaign is so important.  We need to be next to those magazines that say, “Lose 20 pounds in a week!”  First of all, that’s impossible.  Second, you don’t need to lose 20 pounds; you need to healthy, you need to love your body.

We don’t want to put weight and happiness together. Until you make self-acceptance your priority, you’re never going to happy if you just focus on weight.


When I look at your blog, I don’t see a lot of body diversity.  Have you thought about how Indie Chicks could be more inclusive?

We definitely have.  Our website is actually going through a complete re-branding and we’ve definitely taken note about diversity. Although our articles have one feature image, our focus is on the content. And because we’re trying to tap into so many angles and there’s only three of us, we’re spread thin. We use stock images, we recycle images, and what’s available in terms of diversity or plus size is much harder to find.

So, for us, it’s more about the written content. Our main category is self-esteem and confidence, second category is love and sex, then we move into health and fitness, beauty and style.  For our love and sex articles - or dating - it takes a lot of time to dig up that one photograph of a “normal-looking” couple that really embodies what the article is going to be about.  That definitely needs to change.


What has your own experience with body image been like?

Read This Related Article:
When Body Positivity Feels Impossible
I actually got bullied pretty severely for looking the way that I did when I was growing up. I developed when I was a little bit young, and kids would say, “Look at her – look at her boobs!” so I had to deal with the feeling like I was wrong to have the body that I did, even though I wasn’t overweight. We all have these feelings when we step in front of the mirror.

I’ve battled with my body fluctuating up and down a bit, and I have Mediterranean anemia. So while I’m now on the skinny side, I’m not fit, and I’ve been complimented for the wrong thing. So while I may look ‘great’ to some people, I actually feel terrible, and I’ve had to clarify the difference between “skinny” and “healthy.”


You’ve responded to women who have said that they want more content and less traditional advertising in the magazine. How will you keep Indie Chicks Magazine on the shelves without a lot of advertising?

indiechickmagazineThe magazine is just one branch of Indie Chicks, and we don’t necessarily see it as a money maker. So, in terms of advertising in the magazine – and one of the things that sets us apart – is our aim to keep it quality over quantity.

One of our strategies with advertisers is we don’t represent direct competitors.  That way, they’re pretty much guaranteed that there will be only one or two ads within a category.

We also offer packages to advertisers so they’ll get to sponsor a podcast which reaches a whole different audience or take advantage of our online advertising.

But we don’t want to sacrifice the quality of our magazine, and we don’t want to be like other women’s magazines, so the few brands advertised have to be aligned with our message.


What has the reaction been to the Indie Chicks blog and magazine?

We’ve gotten people emailing us that they’re just thankful that we exist and that we address certain things that others aren’t willing to talk about. It’s really been a combination from our readership: gratefulness, a sense of community, support, encouragement for one another and our projects - so it’s been positive all around.

We see women in their mid 30′s suddenly bond with women in their early 20′s over something they both have in common.  It’s good because that positivity has been fueling our entire brand. And every step that we have taken in developing our brand has been from listening to our readers and the feedback that we’ve received from women of all ages.


How can women learn more about and support Indie Chicks?

Indie Chicks is evolving, and we’ve been growing different branches: we have the IndieChicks Blog, our podcast or Indie Chick Radio, an author’s services branch called Indie Chick Lit, and our publication, Indie Chick Magazine. We’re crowd funding our second issue on indiegogo, and I think we’re off to a really great start.

We’re also on social media, and that has been amazing in terms of support and sharing; our social media shares are phenomenal as it is - even without our new referral program up and running.


What is the definition of an Indie Chick?

It is such a personal definition for women, but some of our readers identify themselves as a ‘self-empowered badass.’ Other women adopt the concept of being a sub-category of feminism.

There are different interpretations, and that’s exactly what we wanted, because it’s not up to us to define it for you. You define it. For me, personally, it’s a woman who’s confident and strong, who accepts herself and has the sense of an inner warrior.

Are you an Indie Chick?

Is Indie Chicks for you?
Yes, definitely!
Looks promising.
Not sure: I need to know more.
It’s not for me!

Poll Maker

Indie Chicks hopes to be a new voice in media for women who want an alternative to traditional women’s magazines. They take their readers seriously and welcome their input in the evolution of their brand.

While their health and fitness articles may not be completely in line with our own non-diet philosophy, they are on the right track with their main focus being on self-esteem, self-acceptance and health.

Take a look at the Indie Chicks blog and let us know what you think! Leave a comment below or take our poll.


Find Out Why Our Healthy Weight Retreat Is Different

The post An Interview With Chiara Mazzucco, CEO and Editor-in-Chief of Indie Chicks appeared first on Green Mountain at Fox Run.

]]>
http://www.fitwoman.com/blog/2014/08/20/indie-chicks/feed/ 0
Our New Binge Eating Pathway Series http://www.fitwoman.com/blog/2014/08/19/binge-eating-pathway-series/ http://www.fitwoman.com/blog/2014/08/19/binge-eating-pathway-series/#comments Tue, 19 Aug 2014 13:00:32 +0000 http://www.fitwoman.com/?p=27442 Out of control. Depression. Shame. These are feelings women who binge eat know all too well. But there is something you can do right now to take your life in a new direction. If you struggle with Binge Eating, sometimes known as Compulsive Eating, we have a new series at Green Mountain at Fox Run. New Binge Eating Pathway℠ Series Pathway is a brand […] Read more »

The post Our New Binge Eating Pathway Series appeared first on Green Mountain at Fox Run.

]]>
pathway-binge-eating-seriesOut of control. Depression. Shame. These are feelings women who binge eat know all too well. But there is something you can do right now to take your life in a new direction.

If you struggle with Binge Eating, sometimes known as Compulsive Eating, we have a new series at Green Mountain at Fox Run.

New Binge Eating Pathway℠ Series

Dr. Kari AndersonPathway is a brand new two-week series led by Kari Anderson, DBH, LPC, Binge Eating Specialist at Green Mountain at Fox Run.

Integrated into our core program, you’ll have the opportunity to work in small groups (12 participants max) to explore the roots of your binge eating and how to overcome it.

You’ll gain:

  • An experience of empowerment and freedom from the shame and secrecy you now may feel about binge eating.
  • An understanding of how to overcome binge eating, based on your individual history and needs.
  • An opportunity to stop binge eating and gain the know-how and confidence to do the same back home

Topics you’ll also explore include:

  • “Understanding the Neuroscience of Change”
  • “Breaking up is hard to do–saying goodbye to the Binge”
  • “Why can’t I Just Do It? Understanding the parts of yourself holding you back from changing.”
  • “Family Habits & Routines: Creating new ground rules for family and others in your life.”

Learn more about the new series here. An introductory offer of 30% is now in effect so enroll now. Space is limited.


Find Out More About Our Binge Eating Pathway Series

The post Our New Binge Eating Pathway Series appeared first on Green Mountain at Fox Run.

]]>
http://www.fitwoman.com/blog/2014/08/19/binge-eating-pathway-series/feed/ 0
My Eyes Are Up Here: How One Green Mountain Mama Got Her Mojo Back http://www.fitwoman.com/blog/2014/08/14/eyes-one-green-mountain-mama-got-mojo-back/ http://www.fitwoman.com/blog/2014/08/14/eyes-one-green-mountain-mama-got-mojo-back/#comments Thu, 14 Aug 2014 13:00:00 +0000 http://www.fitwoman.com/?p=27408 Today’s post is courtesy of another articulate Green Mountain alum (or Green Mountain Mama as she puts it). Cat Mitchell will start regularly writing for A Weight Lifted, to share her experience as a young woman set on taking back her life as she moves away from old notions of self to ones that support her in living fully. “Yeah, you work it, […] Read more »

The post My Eyes Are Up Here: How One Green Mountain Mama Got Her Mojo Back appeared first on Green Mountain at Fox Run.

]]>
eyes-are-up-here-cat-mitchellToday’s post is courtesy of another articulate Green Mountain alum (or Green Mountain Mama as she puts it). Cat Mitchell will start regularly writing for A Weight Lifted, to share her experience as a young woman set on taking back her life as she moves away from old notions of self to ones that support her in living fully.

“Yeah, you work it, big girl!”

It’s late August. I’m walking down the main street of the bustling college town I just moved to. It’s my first night in there and I’m trying to find the plaza where I’ll be meeting up with some friends before we head off to explore the local bar scene. I walk by the bus stop and that’s when I hear it—“Yeah, you work it, big girl!”


“Okay, hold up,” I thought, “Was that?—did he?—did I just get catcalled and called fat? Um, did I just get fatcalled?

Overcoming Weight Stigma and Negative Self Talk

Along with that blatant display of one dude’s opinion about my weight, there are about a million ways that other people judge our bodies, even if it’s as simple as the barista looking at my body instead of my face when I give them my coffee order. I’m sure I’m not the only woman who’s had to deal with stares from strangers, prying questions from friends, and the often unhealthy diet and exercise “advice” that other people love to give out, whether it’s at home, at the grocery, at the bookstore, at the gym, on TV, in magazines, and…well, you get it, pretty much everywhere. And forget about eating out.

Read This Related Article:
Self Talk Tips to Fight Weight Stigma
Sometimes it feels like being a woman in today’s society, no matter what your size, means that your body, your weight, and your eating choices are constantly under scrutiny. Add to that the relentless talk and worry about our country’s obesity “epidemic,” and our bodies and the issues surrounding them can constantly feel like other people’s business. Even those with the best intentions can sometimes overwhelm us with food guilt, gym guilt, and body guilt.  So, how do you deal with all of these difficult-to-avoid judgments and the emotions they bring up?

Body Acceptance –  The Key to Peace and Successful Change

When I came to Green Mountain in April of this year, that was a question I definitely needed an answer to. I needed to learn a positive way to deal with not only my health and my body but how much I worried over what other people thought about those two things.

Through classes, time, and lots of honest discussions with the amazing women who were there, I was able to find a peaceful voice inside myself that could deal with all the struggles I would face.  I found the side of myself that would help me become the woman I’ve always wanted to be—I call that woman a Green Mountain Mama.

My Green Mountain Mama? She’s awesome.

She’s the kind of woman who climbs mountains, just because she feels like it.  She’s mindful, she’s beautiful, and she knows how valuable she is. She meets tough challenges with strength and love. That’s who I’m trying to be every single day. No matter who gets in my business. No matter what the scale says.

Here’s hoping that you connect with your own Green Mountain Mama, whomever your version of her happens to be.


Learn More About Our Weight Management Program

The post My Eyes Are Up Here: How One Green Mountain Mama Got Her Mojo Back appeared first on Green Mountain at Fox Run.

]]>
http://www.fitwoman.com/blog/2014/08/14/eyes-one-green-mountain-mama-got-mojo-back/feed/ 2